archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

We aren’t sure how it happened, but Godzilla appears to have gotten stuck while walking through the gardens of Tokyo Midtown. He’s only visible from about the waist up (Godzilla has a waist, right?) along with a portion of his tail. But at 6.6 meters (~22 feet) tall, he’s still an awesome sight to behold, even more so at night when the lights and smoke machines turn on. And then the spikes on back light up as well, as though a surge of electricity is traveling down them. So awesome!

This statue was built to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the original Godzilla as well as the Japanese release of the new Godzilla film. The King of the Monsters will be stuck in this Tokyo Midtown park until the end of August. So if you’ve ever wanted to give him a hug, now’s your chance.

Photos 1-3 by Héctor García, 4-6 by Zan Woo.

[via Kuriositas and Kotaku]

fastcompany
fastcompany:

TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.
When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.
Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 
Read More>

Self driving assault vehicles play a big role in Daniel Suarez’s book DAEMON and a bit in FreedomTM.

fastcompany:

TerraMax kits turn ordinary military trucks into self-driving road warriors.

When you think of self-driving vehicles, you probably think of Google, Audi, and Daimler. Although the research underlying all of their advances was funded by DARPA, it’s somewhat surprising that the military isn’t already way ahead of everyone else when it comes to remote-controlled ground movement.

Oshkosh Defense is hoping to change that. 

Read More>

Self driving assault vehicles play a big role in Daniel Suarez’s book DAEMON and a bit in FreedomTM.

doctorwho
doctorwho:

bbcamerica:

Doctor Who is back on the big screen with the Series 8 Premiere – DEEP BREATH – on 25 August in cinemas throughout the US and Canada. 

Peter Capaldi’s first full episode as the Doctor - Deep Breath - will be screened in cinemas around the world from 23 August 2014.
This year’s screenings follow the success of the global cinema release of Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary episode The Day of the Doctor which was screened in over 1500 cinemas around the world, allowing fans to come together to watch the show like never before.
Steven Moffat comments, “Last November the Doctor didn’t just conquer the world on television, he did it in the cinemas too. And like the show-off he is, he can’t resist another go - one taste of the silver screen is never enough. On August 23rd the new Doctor will begin his new adventures on BBC One and in cinemas all over the world. Movie-land beware - Capaldi is coming to get you!” [x]

Theater locations and ticketing to be announced later this month.

You can find out more information on global cinema screenings at the doctorwho.tv dedicated cinema page as information arrives. 

doctorwho:

bbcamerica:

Doctor Who is back on the big screen with the Series 8 Premiere – DEEP BREATH – on 25 August in cinemas throughout the US and Canada. 

Peter Capaldi’s first full episode as the Doctor - Deep Breath - will be screened in cinemas around the world from 23 August 2014.

This year’s screenings follow the success of the global cinema release of Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary episode The Day of the Doctor which was screened in over 1500 cinemas around the world, allowing fans to come together to watch the show like never before.

Steven Moffat comments, “Last November the Doctor didn’t just conquer the world on television, he did it in the cinemas too. And like the show-off he is, he can’t resist another go - one taste of the silver screen is never enough. On August 23rd the new Doctor will begin his new adventures on BBC One and in cinemas all over the world. Movie-land beware - Capaldi is coming to get you!” [x]

Theater locations and ticketing to be announced later this month.

You can find out more information on global cinema screenings at the doctorwho.tv dedicated cinema page as information arrives. 

egspoony

egspoony:

leahj:

8bitian:

ghost-anus:

the best pranks are the super harmless ones

like why would you pull someones pants down in public or like put them in danger or humiliate them when you can just baffle them by leaving tiny plastic camels all over their house or taping bill cosby’s face over every single face in  every picture in their house?

I feel like leahj would have something to say about this

Yes. Obviously the best pranks are not when it’s Bill Cosby, but Edgar.

So… Back in March I was out celebrating my girlfriend’s birthday when I was approached. I was recognized by a couple. By the couple who’s home was the recipient of Leah’s pictures of me from this video. I encountered Keith’s brother and the brother’s wife. The best pranks are when it’s Edgar and the person doesn’t even know Edgar…

EDGAR! I love that they met you! We did a really good job Edgaring Keith’s brother’s house. A really good job!

8bitian

piranhapunk:

image

Twenty-five years and three days later, reality takes a tip from fiction and charts “Weird Al” Yankovic’s new album Mandatory Fun at number one, with over 100,000 sales during it’s first week. In his 31 year long career, with 14 studio albums to his name, this is the first time he’s hit the top- and the first comedy album by ANY artist to hit #1 since 1960! Congratulations, Al! image

lickystickypickyshe
lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 
The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious. 
His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.
So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 
“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”

lickystickypickyshe:

In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums. 

The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious

His main source is an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, which he leased when he heard the orchard was to be torn down. After developing a timeline of when each of the 250 varieties blossom in relation to each other, he would graft a few onto the root structure of a single tree. When his “working tree” was about two years old, he would add more varieties onto the tree as separate branches — a technique called “chip grafting,” Science Alert explains. A sliver that includes a bud is inserted into an incision in the working tree and then taped in place. After it heals over the winter, the branch becomes just another normal branch on the tree, to be pruned as usual.

So far, 16 of these Trees of 40 Fruit have been grown, each taking about five years. He picked stone fruits because they’ve got a lot of diversity and they’re inter-compatible. And a bit of garlic and peppermint repellents keep deer away. 

“By grafting these different varieties onto the tree in a certain order I can essentially sculpt how the tree is to blossom,” he says. “I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit.”