I tumble for you

Aug 20

libawr:

(chart: where we donate vs diseases that kill us, via The truth about the Ice Bucket Challenge: Viral memes shouldn’t dictate our charitable giving - Vox)
For the record, I think the Ice Bucket Challenge is great.
Anything that motivates people to give - and to publicly talk about their giving, making it part of their online identities - helps to create a stronger culture of giving. I refuse to accept the argument that campaigns like this necessarily cannibalize other, “better,” giving; after all, while writing a check for $100 to the ALS Assn may compete with writing $100 checks to other orgs, it also competes with watching TV or online shopping or pretty much any other way we might spend our time or money.
Reaching folks who may not have donated otherwise is a good thing for every charity. But just as not every org can/should require an “Ice Bucket” moment (or whatever the most recent viral hit might be - remember Kony??) to be successful, not every potential donor requires clever gimmicks to motivate them to give. Ideally, some percentage of IBC donors will become more savvy and look at other factors next time - after all, the Challenge accomplished a lot of things, but cultivating repeat donors for ALS is probably not one of them.
So, for those of us looking for something beyond memes, this article is a great place to start.

Preach, Liba!

libawr:

(chart: where we donate vs diseases that kill us, via The truth about the Ice Bucket Challenge: Viral memes shouldn’t dictate our charitable giving - Vox)

For the record, I think the Ice Bucket Challenge is great.

Anything that motivates people to give - and to publicly talk about their giving, making it part of their online identities - helps to create a stronger culture of giving. I refuse to accept the argument that campaigns like this necessarily cannibalize other, “better,” giving; after all, while writing a check for $100 to the ALS Assn may compete with writing $100 checks to other orgs, it also competes with watching TV or online shopping or pretty much any other way we might spend our time or money.

Reaching folks who may not have donated otherwise is a good thing for every charity. But just as not every org can/should require an “Ice Bucket” moment (or whatever the most recent viral hit might be - remember Kony??) to be successful, not every potential donor requires clever gimmicks to motivate them to give. Ideally, some percentage of IBC donors will become more savvy and look at other factors next time - after all, the Challenge accomplished a lot of things, but cultivating repeat donors for ALS is probably not one of them.

So, for those of us looking for something beyond memes, this article is a great place to start.

Preach, Liba!

[video]

ariverisariver:

In order to get my hunting license, I was tested on my ability to remember the basic rules of gun safety, one of which was: Don’t point your gun at anything you don’t intend to shoot.

And that was just so I was legally allowed to shoot little tasty birds.

“I’ll never talk to my daughter about fitting into THAT DRESS. But I will talk to her about what it sounds like to hear pine needles crunching under my feet and what it feels like to cross a finish line and how special it is to see the world on foot. I will talk to her about hard work and self sufficiency. I will teach her the joy of working out by showing her I love it. And I’ll leave the rest up to her.” —

10 Things I Want My Daughter to Know About Working Out | wellfesto

I signed up with a personal trainer for 24 sessions to balance out grad school (and sitting 6 days a week for the next year). But I told them weight isn’t a metric that we’re going to use - strength, flexibility, bone density and core, but not weight.

maliara:

I ask for pizza

maliara:

I ask for pizza

(via twohippiechic)

Aug 19

Bike Theft and Crazy Coincidences

rosscott:

Well, this is ridiculous.

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ABOVE: A picture of my bike from months ago.

On Friday night, amidst trying to walk a dog and get a sick girlfriend home, I locked my bike outside my apartment to a small fence outside the building instead of lugging it into the bike room in my building (which has been largely blocked by maintenance people’s stuff).

Some time between Saturday and Sunday, the bike was stolen. I was upset. In fact, I still am upset. There’s the money, sure. But moreover, it was stolen from outside where I live. There is theft in my neighborhood, and apparently locking up a bike isn’t enough.

My girlfriend Kristen was kind enough to help me start to get things in order, and on Monday put in a police report for the bike, and I mentally tried to move on. It was kinda working.

But here’s where it gets infinitely more interesting.

Around 5pm, one of my coworkers (Brandon, now known as “Eagle Eye” Brandon) came and told me that he thought he saw my bike parked downstairs. I figured sure, it was a bike that looked like mine. I had been looking at every bike I passed along the way as well. But I figured it couldn’t hurt.

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ABOVE: A photo of the bike with someone else’s lock on it. They removed the “bar ends” and the headlight mount, but otherwise all intact.

We got outside, and it didn’t just look like my bike. It was my bike.The scratches from my U-lock. The stickers I left on the frame. The little blinky light mount I left on the back. The rear bike rack. The new pedals (that’s why they aren’t in the first photo). Hell, the OnGuard wheel locks I had installed (which were bought at the time I purchased the bike, and are no longer available).

So now, there’s my bike. It’s locked up with someone else’s U-lock. What do you do? I mean, do you call the cops? Do you try and pry off the lock? Do you steal all the parts that aren’t nailed down? Do you just, I dunno, wait?

I decided to call the cops. I had photos of the bike on my phone, and things were just so. Special (non-standard) handlebars, it’s not that common of a bike, I figured I had a good shot. When the police officers showed up, they could not believe the coincidence that my bike had showed up at my office locked up after being stolen at my apartment. Was I sure this was my bike? Why would it be here? Yes. It’s weird.

Without registration and concrete proof the bike was mine, there was nothing they could do. They said they’d be in the area and would check in on it, but that if I had registration I should run home and get it. I had a U-lock on the bike so it couldn’t walk away again, but the cop told me to remove it.

So I had some friends from the office stay with the bike and I ran home. I couldn’t find the registration paperwork (BE SURE TO REGISTER EVERYTHING WORTH MORE THAN $100 AND WRITE IT DOWN) but I did find the serial number written down, and the wheel lock key. I brought both back to the scene  and called the police again.

20 minutes later, they showed up, and it’s not enough. Since none of it was the official registration and serial number, no amount of coincidence would convince them. On one hand, I understand. On the other, the chances of all of these things being the exact same, and finding the bike 1.5 miles from home is astronomical. This cop told me to put a U-lock on it so the bike couldn’t walk away, so I did.

Now, the bike sits. There’s a note on it explaining that it’s my bike and I want it back, please remove their lock. Who knows if the person who rode it and locked it up is the thief or just someone who bought it. Either way, I hope they decide to comply. 

The note:

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In the morning, I’m going to try and find the real registration for the bike (I must’ve registered it in a few places, but the bike shop doesn’t keep records back that far and the wheel lock company and bike company are closed for the night).

I’ll update you guys with more when there’s more to tell.

Aug 18

“This story was put on the map, driven and followed on social media more so than any story I can remember since the Arab Spring,” he said in a phone interview on Saturday. “On Wednesday night, when things went down, we were putting together live feeds and Twitter reports. Good luck running around there with a camera man and a news crew. You saw what happened to Al Jazeera’s crew.” — View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention - NYTimes.com

“But the web crackled with one story and one story only. It wasn’t long before cable news made adjustments and a huge story — a militarized response to a mostly nonviolent exercise of free speech — took center stage. For that you can thank Twitter, which is often derided as a platform for banalities but has become much more than that in the age of always-on information.” — View of #Ferguson Thrust Michael Brown Shooting to National Attention - NYTimes.com

Aug 17

“And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.” — Robin Williams Did Not Die From “Suicide”

When I’m out and a guy asks me what I’m doing afterwards

whatshouldwecallme:

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