I tumble for you

Sep 30

““Apologize for something stupid you did when you were 4?” she said and smiled that lovely smile I remembered from preschool, then added, “Were you this weird back in preschool, too?” She laughed and so did I, because the truth is I really was weird in preschool.” — Why Yom Kippur Is Author Etgar Keret’s Favorite Holiday – Tablet Magazine

[video]

“littletinyfish said: Are you still working at Olson?” —

I tumble for you — My “first day of school” photo for Northwestern.

Yep! School is from 9-5 on Saturdays for a year and work is all the other hours of the week.

(via gradschoolnotes)

Sep 29

“Reading long sentences without links is a skill you need — but can lose if you don’t practice. Reading long, literary sentences sans links and distractions is actually a serious skill that you lose if you don’t use it.” —

Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books - Mic

Thankfully, the year before I started at DePaul, I read a whole bunch of long, complicated novels. And the year before I started at Northwestern, I went to DePaul

My “first day of school” photo for Northwestern.

My “first day of school” photo for Northwestern.

High Holy Day Schedule

tbdminyan:

September 12 - Shabbat Dinner

September 21 - Vision Boards for 5775

September 25 - Rosh Hashanah Dinner

October 4 - Yom Kippur Break Fast

October 11 - Havdalah in the Sukkah

Find all events and RSVP on Eventbrite

Two more events this holiday season if you’d like to join TBD Minyan in Chicago. I can also help you get tickets to Emanuel Congregation in Edgewater, if you need somewhere to be on Yom Kippur.

“If those whom we begin to love could know us as we were before meeting them … they could perceive what they have made of us.” — Albert Camus on Happiness and Love, Illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton | Brain Pickings (via gradschoolnotes)

(via gradschoolnotes)

gradschoolnotes:

(via In “Pen and Ink,” People Tell the Fascinating Stories Behind Their Tattoos | Mother Jones)
As seen on Amazon, “People who bought this item, also bought Levi’s Men’s 511 Slim Fit jeans.”

gradschoolnotes:

(via In “Pen and Ink,” People Tell the Fascinating Stories Behind Their Tattoos | Mother Jones)

As seen on Amazon, “People who bought this item, also bought Levi’s Men’s 511 Slim Fit jeans.”

“When I visit my family in England, no longer do I walk the streets with a yarmulke on my head as I do in America. I can still feel the sting of fruit pelted at my face a handful of years ago as I stood at a London bus stop. I don’t need a second warning. From street thugs to elected officials, from the resurrection of old prejudices cloaked in the politeness of pseudo-political garb to a resurgence of vile blood libel charges, and everything in between, the writing is on the wall. Not another Holocaust – God forbid! – that is not what I am suggesting. Rather a sad and scary existence in which Jews are implicitly or explicitly forced to choose between loyalty to Europe or loyalty to Israel, or even worse, loyalty to being a Jew.” — The 615th Commandment | Park Avenue Synagogue

Sep 28

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

(via angelchrys)